How does our brain process fear? Study investigates | Medical News Today

Do you live a life in fear of something, and does it affect how and what you do?

  • When faced with something that you fear how do you react? do you run, or do you face it?
  • How do we make these choices?
  • Why do we react the way that we do?

The following article discusses the future possibility of new treatments, for the field of mental health medicines / treatments, after researchers found the brain circuit that is involved in processing fear, and the ‘fight-or- flight’ response.

The ‘fight-or-flight’ response (also known as ‘hyperarousal’, or the ‘acute-stress response’), was first described by Walter Bradford Cannon as a physiological reaction that occurs in response to a perceived harmful event, trauma, attack, or threat to survival.

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How does our brain process fear? Study investigates | Medical News Today

  |  Published: Sunday 12 February 2017

Updated 18 March 2018

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One thought on “How does our brain process fear? Study investigates | Medical News Today

  1. Our brains are hardwired to be on the lookout for danger. When we’re afraid, we often search for context cues that we can use in the future to prepare ourselves for similar experiences. Unfortunately, sometimes, we then become afraid in situations when no danger exists. Thanks for putting this out there for all of us.

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